Why Autographed Novels Put Bookstores in Danger

I found this intriguing post to be eye-opening and I found myself weighting the pros and cons of this kind of litigation against independent bookstore owners. What do WordPress bloggers think? K D
Via: https://kristentwardowski.wordpress.com/2017/05/14/when-autographed-novels-put-bookstores-in-danger/

Kristen Twardowski

Book Passage is a quirky little bookstore situated in the Bay Area of California. Sure, it sells books, but it also does so much more. Every year the shop hosts over 700 author events. During these events, authors often sign books, and if any signed books remain after the crowds have thinned, Book Passage sells copies in the store. Because the shop wants to keep these items accessible to everyone, they sell autographed copies for the same amount of money as the mundane editions to books.

This practice is a wonderful one, but Book Passage may soon have to stop selling autographed books all together.

640px-Bookstore_Display_for_Gavrilo_Princip_-_Assassin_of_Archduke_Ferdinand_(1914)_-_Belgrade_-_Serbia_(15194901854) Image via Wikimedia, Adam Jones, “Bookstore Display for Gavrilo Princip – Assassin of Archduke Ferdinand (1914) Belgrade, Serbia, 17 November 2014.

Late last week I saw a troubling press release put out for the Book Passage by the legal group the Pacific Legal Foundation. On…

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THE GIRL IN BLACK by Kathy Lauren Miller – A REVIEW

“The Girl in Black” by Kathy Lauren Miller is a hauntingly taut murder mystery as well as an awesome page-turner! The mystery begins with high school senior, Kate Mckenna who happens to live in an old Victorian manor that is also the Mckenna Memorial Funeral Home. Her father, Dr. Brendan Mckenna, happens to be the county’s Chief Medical Examiner. Shy Kate, whose social life as always been nearly non-existent until she is thrust into the limelight when the promiscuous prom queen, Ashley is found tortured and murdered.

Accusations run rampant in Kate’s High School concerning several male students that were involved with Ashley. To make matters worse, Ashley’s remains now reside at the funeral home where Kate lives. Kate and her best friend Cooper, a computer nerd, and Kate’s unattainable heartthrob, handsome Shane, all become involved in Ashley’s murder. Suddenly, Kate finds herself in the cross hairs of the sadistic killer and the vengeful ghost of Ashley, the murdered prom queen. What happens next is beyond Kate’s worse nightmare. The Girl in Black is a fascinating and terrifying murder mystery that will keep you guessing until the end. I highly recommend this book. (less)

The Written Word, The Writer, and Morality

Sam Harris, philosopher, neuroscientist, writer and author writes, “Human well-being is not a random phenomenon. It depends on many factors – ranging from genetics and neurobiology to sociology and economics. But, clearly, there are scientific truths to be known about how we can flourish in this world. Wherever we can have an impact on the well-being of others, questions of morality apply.”

     Morality is complicated. Morality is subjective. Morality is ethics. Morality is judgment. Morality is not universal. Morality is societal, Morality is personal.  As writers, we often write about heroics, doing-the-right-thing, righting wrongs, standing up to injustice, caring for others, human rights as moral convictions, judging as a moral imperative, life-saving as a moral imperative, killing evil-doers as a moral imperative.

    What I do know is that morality is in the eye of the beholder’s belief systems. Writers, whether consciously or unconsciously, liberally sow the seeds of morality reflecting their visions of the world at large. Writers often change concepts of morality by storytelling. Writers suggest ways of behaving by allowing the protagonist to behave in a moral or immoral sense of their own belief system, that either promotes heroic actions, self-sacrifices, doing good needs or “its every man for himself.”

  I wonder, do writers have the moral obligation, as Sam Harris states, “Wherever we can have an impact on the well-being of others, questions of morality apply.”  Yes, morality is complicated.