“Poetic Passion” by Timothy M. Divito

A beautiful book of poetry that will be published in early December. This poetry book focuses on romance, love, life, loss, and surviving life’s crushing blows. DiVito’s book of Poetry, “Poetic Passion” soon to be on Amazon in December is about about love, life and the stories of humanity.

Timothy Michael DiVito , author of Poetic Passion

THE MOON AT NOON

Have you seen

The Moon at noon?

As a pale reflection,

A mere cartoon?

Does it make you

Wonder why?

While stealthily gazing

At the sky?

Why the Moon,

Does seem to follow,

The yellow Sun,

Like a silver shadow?

With a secret smile,

Upon its face,

Does it mean

To take its place?

Could you contend,

With a silver light,

When the dawn breaks,

At daylight?

And could you see,

The stars so bright,

Through a yellow Sun

At Midnight?

Alas, whom among us,

Would then wish to croon,

Amis so much confusion,

A tune to the Moon?

So, when you gaze,

Upon the Moon at Noon,

Say a Silent Prayer,

Not to make it soon!

                                                        Karen Ann DeMers (c) 1984

 

 

 

 

“The Fight Of Our Lives”

A beautifully express poem about the truth and where we, as Americans, stand or fall as we plunge into a hellish place led by the devilish man called Trump – the wanna be dictator of America, no longer the free.

Poetry of Emotions

You chase us into the darkness
with your hateful touch
but we still manage to see the light.


You anger us with your harshness
we used to run freely as such
now we are awake all day and night


Infecting our compassionate humanity
with your wicked ways
leaving separated and socially distanced


Yet we forget our prideful vanity
seemingly hiding away
not forgetting who we are for an instance


So many sweet sorrowful deaths
now taste of the earth
as many mourn hearts dearly broken


So many sacred souls holding their breath
red crosses since birth
for the heroes proper words cannot be spoken.


Timothy Michael DiVito c2020

“To endure the fight of life”

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Annie’s Land

In Annie’s land

The world looks so bright,

cause it glows in a magical light.

As the day dawns

on green velvet lawns,

clouds of pink cotton candy,

billow forth and taste just dandy!

As the Sun in the heavens,

sits on high,

it prances about in a buttercup sky.

While peppermint trees sway in the breeze,

sparkling sugars dance from their leaves.

Cherry bright berries look so merry,

while on marsh-mellow mushrooms,

dancing with fairies.

And caramel ants dance in a trance,

To the bluebell’s jingle do the prance.

In Annie’s land there is nothing to fear,

cause nobody ever sheds a tear.

Where every little creature joins the band,

To sing to Annie, cause she’s so grand.

All the little children love her so much,

Cause she gives to them all her magical touch.

In Annie’s land the world looks so bright,

Cause everybody knows it glows with God’s light.

Karen DeMers © 1983

Beneath a Satin Moon

Beneath a Satin Moon,

In a golden wood,

Beneath a painted sky,

A paper house is standing,

Underneath a satin Moon.

And in the garden growing,

Pastel flowers flourish,

And never lose their bloom.

Summer, Winter, Spring or Fall,

As lovely as they are,

They never see a raindrop fall.

And tiger lilies made of silk,

Slink around a lily pond,

Of which there are, you know,

Quite fond.

As gilded Goldfish swim

amidst the frilly lilies,

Blue waters smooth as glass,

Gaze upon the heavens,

As they pass,

Reflecting all they see,

In nature’s perfect harmony.

All this of course,

Is nothing but pure imagery,

But none the less,

It interests me.

For it’s as real,

as real can be,

But then, of course,

Who knows reality?

                                                Karen Ann DeMers © 1996

The Best is Yet to Be!

Cold days are these bringing men to their knees,

a feast for the wolves in the Winter woods.

Pray not to be prey by shattered hearts seized,

bitterness wholeheartedly understood. 

Memorable times of loves far away,

wash over me like the high ocean tides.

I gave my heart so freely come what may,

waiting for the sun and moon to collide. 

For that which takes my soul to rue despair

the glistening hopes are of good favor.

Yet, I shall breathe again in caution’s care,

for the passion of love, I shall savor. 

My heart dawns, it sincerely dawns for thee,

for this fact surely the best is yet to be.

by Timothy Michael DiVito  2020

What Would The Greatest Generation Do?

Many in the younger generation really need to read this because many have been corrupted by what surrounds them: racism, greed, lust, hate, and no inner core, no belief in goodness, sharing or true love; only anger.

charles french words reading and writing

Poor_mother_and_children,_Oklahoma,_1936_by_Dorothea_Lange

(https://commons.wikimedia.org)

My parents were in the generation that faced the twin horrors of The Great Depression and World War Two. They experienced economic hardships past anything that we are suffering today. They fought a war against two tyrannies in Japan and Germany. They fought in a war, that at the most conservative, estimate killed 56 million people. The Greatest Generation did not worry about being inconvenienced; they did not let fear stop them. They did what they had to do, and they sacrificed in ways that are almost incomprehensible to people today.

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(https://www.goodfreephotos.com)

I shake my head when I see people protesting the lockdowns that are aimed at saving lives. They speak of inconvenience. Could these people have fought World War Two or lived through the hardships of the Great Depression? I think not. I know people are frustrated, but people gathering in crowds in protests, with no masks, are…

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Ellen Russell Mallory – First Lady of Key West

Ellen Russell Mallory – First Lady of Key West

 

Ellen Russell Mallory (1792-1855) settled in Key West with her ailing husband Charles and two young sons in 1823.  She was first white female settler in Key West.  Her husband and elder son died in 1825.  To support herself and her surviving son Stephen, Ellen Mallory opened her home as boarding house for seamen.  During frequent Yellow Fever outbreaks, she served as the town’s nurse.  She provided a good education for her surviving son, sending him to a Moravian academy in Nazareth, Pennsylvania.  Ellen was a leading figure in the growth and life of Key West until her death in 1855.  Her son went on to become a U.S. Senator, and then Secretary of the Navy for the Confederate States.  Mallory Square is named after her son Stephen Russell Mallory.

 

Ellen Russell Mallory

 

Ellen Russell was born in 1792 at Carrick-on-Suir, near Waterford, Ireland.  Carrick-on-Suir is situated in the southeastern corner of County Tipperary, 17 miles northwest of Waterford.  When she was orphaned at about thirteen years of age, she was adopted by two bachelor uncles (her mother’s brothers), who were planters on the island of Trinidad.  There she met Charles Mallory and married him when she was no more than sixteen years of age.  Charles Mallory was a construction engineer, originally from Redding, Connecticut.  Charles and Ellen Mallory had two children, sons John and Stephen.  Charles Mallory’s health then began to fail.  The family left Trinidad and came to the United States around 1820, leaving seven-year-old son Stephen in school near Mobile, Alabama.  After trying the climate of Havana for a short time, the family moved to Key West in 1823, when the island was inhabited by only a few fishermen and pirates.  Charles Mallory died of consumption at Key West in 1825.  The elder son John died shortly thereafter, at only fourteen years of age.  To support herself and her surviving son Stephen, Ellen opened her home as a boarding house for seamen.

 

Ellen Mallory’s boarding house “Cocoanut Grove”

 

Her boarding house, the “Cocoanut Grove”, was the only lodging in Key West for many years.   With her meager earnings from the boarding house, she sent her son away for further schooling at a Moravian academy in Nazareth, Pennsylvania.  Although, like his mother, he was a devout Catholic, he had only praise for the education he received at the academy.  After three years, his mother could no longer afford to pay his tuition; so in 1829 his schooling ended and he returned home to Key West.

 

Ellen’s boarding house remained a center of social life and hospitality in Key West throughout the remainder of her life.  She nursed and cared for many of the sick and injured in Key West, during numerous outbreaks of Yellow Fever and hurricanes.  The hurricane of 1846 was one of such unusual severity that it obliterated the graves of her late husband Charles and son John.  Ellen lived to see her son, Stephen Russell Mallory, become a successful lawyer, marry well and have children of his own, and become a United States Senator in 1850.

 

After 32 years as the beloved “First Lady” of Key West, Ellen Russell Mallory died on May 15, 1855.  Perhaps at no time was the Key West custom of closing the stores along the route of a funeral procession as a tribute of respect more spontaneously and wholeheartedly observed than when Ellen Mallory’s remains were born to her final resting place.  Nearly the entire population of Key West walked behind her bier to the cemetery.  She was buried in the town’s new cemetery, founded after the great hurricane of 1846, where a stone about six feet long is inscribed:

MALLORY

Ellen Mallory

born at

Carrick-on-Suir, 1792

died at Key West

May 15, 1855

 

Excerpts from an article in The Florida Historical Quarterly; Volume 25, Issue 4:

 

Of those who have been identified with early Key West, one who has been given highest acclaim is Ellen Mallory, Stephen R. Mallory’s mother.  A contemporary noted:  “The first white female settler of Key West was Mrs. Mallory in 1823, the mother of the present United States Senator from Florida; she is an intelligent, energetic woman of Irish descent, and still keeps an excellent boarding house, for the accommodation of visitors there being no taverns upon the island.”

Another noted that “For some considerable time [after 1823] she was without a single companion of her own sex [on the island].  As the pioneer matron of the place, she was presented with a choice lot of land, on which she has erected a house, which she now occupies, as a boarding house, dispensing to the stranger, with liberal hand, and at a moderate price, the hospitalities of the place.”

Key West’s leading twentieth century chronicler speaks and quotes others: “First in point of time as well as in affection and esteem of her contemporaries, was Mrs. Ellen Mallory. Two distinguished men have told of her virtues,” writes Judge Browne.   He repeats Governor Marvin’s judgment: “I mention Mrs. Mallory last because she is last to be forgotten and not because she was the mother of an United State senator and secretary of the navy of the Confederacy, but because she was situated where she could do good and she did it.

Left a widow in early womanhood, she bravely fought the battle of life alone, and supported herself by her labor in respectful independence.  She kept the principal boarding house in town. She was intelligent, possessed of ready Irish wit, was kind, gentle, charitable, sympathetic, and considerate of the wants of the sick and poor.  She nursed the writer through an attack of yellow fever and was always as good to him as his own mother could have been.”

The sentiment of another, crystallized through a long friendship is contained in an excerpt from an address delivered in 1876: “Methinks I hear her musical voice today as she was wont to speak, standing at the bedside of the sick and dying in days gone by.  Catholic by rites of baptism…Oh, how truly catholic in the better and non-sectarian use of that term, was her life, devoted as it was to acts of kindness.  Her husband died shortly after their arrival; she kept for many years the only comfortable boarding house on the island, located first on the north side of Fitzpatrick Street and subsequently, after the proprietors had expressed their appreciation of her character and usefulness, by a donation of a lot of ground, on her own premises, on the south side of Duval street near Front.  With many opportunities of becoming rich, she died comparatively poor.  Next to her God, her devotion centered in her son, Stephen R. Mallory, whom she brought to this island a child of tender age and lived to see occupying a seat in the Senate of the United States as one of the Senators from Florida.

Going tranquilly about her duties, or dispelling discouragement with the tonic of fortitude and hope, the picture is beautiful.  Twice as I remember, I had the pleasure of receiving the proffered hand of this lady.  First, with words of ‘Welcome’ to your city, when as a poor young man, I became one of your number.  Second, on the occasion of sore affliction, when the balm of consolation gratefully reached my ears, and pointed my mind to contemplations of future usefulness.  She died in 1855.  Her mortal remains lie in yonder cemetery respected of all men.  She left no enemy on earth. ‘Requiescat in pace.’  Such was the woman who founded the family of Mallory in Florida; is it any marvel that she was the mother and grandmother of United States Senators?”

 

 

A Book Review of D. G. Kaye’s Non-Fiction, “Words We Carry”

It is my belief that every woman on the planet should read this non-fiction inspirational story that reveals the negative self-esteem experiences that many if not all women encounter during various incidents throughout their lives, and the consequences of those experiences often begin in early childhood.

D.G. Kaye writes with empathy, compassion, and a plethora of knowledge using her own experiences to help other women understand the importance of realizing their sense of self that is intimately associated with our self-worth. Self-worth is not a vanity and it not excessive pride. It is how we access our own sense of being, of who we are.

The author, D.G. Kaye, writes with a warmhearted conversational style that beautifully eliminates dogma and in effect the judging of us, by us, and others for what we may perceive as a failure to have fallen victim to ridicule, to embarrassment, and instead we begin to believe in our personalities and our value in the world.

Our society often appears to judge women by our appearance: a cultural sense of what beauty is, a person’s station in life, and least but not last – money. If as a child we experienced being bullied, laughed at, ignored, and ridiculed, our self-worth without a positive, loving alternative from your parents, grandparents, and siblings—is damaged and our chances of feeling unlovable, inadequate, and homely take root in our psyche. A psyche that is damaged presents difficulties in our self-expression, our personalities, and our ability to thrive in the world without a sense of inadequacy. This sense of inadequacy leaves us open to being further damaged by others.

D.G. Kaye, the author, encourages us, helps us to understand, and presents a rationale that can and does present a newer, healthier view of ourselves as well as to develop healthier relationships. Once we rid ourselves of negativity, jealousy, envy, and that awful feeling of inadequacy; our inner personalities, our joy of life, and a sense of inner happiness will begin to shine.

D.G. Kaye’s inspirational non-fiction for women is the best of its kind that I have ever read, and a must read for all women. I give this book a 5-star rating.

 

Happy St. Patrick’s Day

How we handle this pandemic, collectively and individually, will be a testament to our strength of character, our empathy, our compassion, and our love of humanity.

charles french words reading and writing

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(https://pixabay.com)

May the road rise up to meet you.
May the wind be always at your back.
May the sun shine warm upon your face;
the rains fall soft upon your fields
and until we meet again,
may God hold you in the palm of His hand.

(Traditional Irish Blessing)
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In this time of uncertainty, risk, and danger, please remember our connections, our strengths, and our blessings.

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