About Karen DeMers Dowdall

Karen DeMers Dowdall was born in West Hartford, Connecticut. She has lived in Taiwan, Saudi Arabia, and England. Karen has a PhD, MSN, BSN, RN in Nursing from Florida Atlantic University. “Books of every genre teach us about life, how we think, and view the world." She has written poems and little short stories since she was a child. Karen loves art, she enjoys drawing, painting in oils, pastels, colored pencils, and doing portraiture. She has also taken ballet, Jazz, and modern dance since she was three years old and owned her own dance studio.

Beyond Tomorrow

Face forward into a windy day and listen

Feel the sun upon your face and dream

Watch the clouds and learn to change

Look to a starry night and know light even in darkness

Gaze upon fields of wheat and see the gold

Go barefoot on a stony path and dance

Watch the trees in the forest and learn to see

Look upon mountains high and know the nobility in a blade of grass

Hear thunder on a stormy day and feel the power

Feel raindrops fall upon your face and drink

Watch lightening cross the sky and learn to strive

Look into the heavens and know the magnificence of you

Listen to the ocean waves and hear the siren’s song

Feel the sand beneath your feet and run

Watch birds fly and learn to soar

Look to the horizon and know infinity

See life as one brand new so that you will remember

That you have come and gone before

And delight in all you see that you may learn

To look beyond tomorrow that you may know forever

By K. Demers Dowdall 2002

Eulie’s Song is a story of Love, and the Longings of the Heart. — Kathy Lauren Miller

Love is a powerful force. Love will define the choices of two girls born a century apart. Choices that will impact not only themselves, but the lives of those they love. One act of desperation in a moment of fear. Eulie, born into slavery, had suffered at the hands of cruel men. She was […]

Eulie’s Song is a story of Love, and the Longings of the Heart. — Kathy Lauren Miller

The Beautiful Words

The beautiful words,

That ring so true,

Bring me but dark memories,

From a time and a place,

Best forgotten.

Yet always, just beneath,

The surface of a black night,

Filled with anguish and loss,

We feel fear, trepidation, horror.

Not of this world.

Not now, I pray,

but then it crawled

Into being, by what force,

I know not.

They say, nonsense, but it lives,

Somewhere, now,

To come again,

To crush, destroy, all the goodness

The world has ever known.

The pinnacle has arrived.

Once again, we face, the face,

Of evil incarnate, we see it,

Daily,

but never acknowledge,

What we see.

We feign ignorance,

Deny what we see,

Yet it creeps to our door,

Seeps under the floor

The poison of its words,

It lies so beautifully.

Karen DeMers Dowdall © 2019

THE MOON AT NOON

Have you seen

The Moon at noon?

As a pale reflection,

A mere cartoon?

Does it make you

Wonder why?

While stealthily gazing

At the sky?

Why the Moon,

Does seem to follow,

The yellow Sun,

Like a silver shadow?

With a secret smile,

Upon its face,

Does it mean

To take its place?

Could you contend,

With a silver light,

When the dawn breaks,

At daylight?

And could you see,

The stars so bright,

Through a yellow Sun

At Midnight?

Alas, whom among us,

Would then wish to croon,

Amis so much confusion,

A tune to the Moon?

So, when you gaze,

Upon the Moon at Noon,

Say a Silent Prayer,

Not to make it soon!

                                                        Karen Ann DeMers (c) 1984

 

 

 

 

Annie’s Land

In Annie’s land

The world looks so bright,

cause it glows in a magical light.

As the day dawns

on green velvet lawns,

clouds of pink cotton candy,

billow forth and taste just dandy!

As the Sun in the heavens,

sits on high,

it prances about in a buttercup sky.

While peppermint trees sway in the breeze,

sparkling sugars dance from their leaves.

Cherry bright berries look so merry,

while on marsh-mellow mushrooms,

dancing with fairies.

And caramel ants dance in a trance,

To the bluebell’s jingle do the prance.

In Annie’s land there is nothing to fear,

cause nobody ever sheds a tear.

Where every little creature joins the band,

To sing to Annie, cause she’s so grand.

All the little children love her so much,

Cause she gives to them all her magical touch.

In Annie’s land the world looks so bright,

Cause everybody knows it glows with God’s light.

Karen DeMers © 1983

Beneath a Satin Moon

Beneath a Satin Moon,

In a golden wood,

Beneath a painted sky,

A paper house is standing,

Underneath a satin Moon.

And in the garden growing,

Pastel flowers flourish,

And never lose their bloom.

Summer, Winter, Spring or Fall,

As lovely as they are,

They never see a raindrop fall.

And tiger lilies made of silk,

Slink around a lily pond,

Of which there are, you know,

Quite fond.

As gilded Goldfish swim

amidst the frilly lilies,

Blue waters smooth as glass,

Gaze upon the heavens,

As they pass,

Reflecting all they see,

In nature’s perfect harmony.

All this of course,

Is nothing but pure imagery,

But none the less,

It interests me.

For it’s as real,

as real can be,

But then, of course,

Who knows reality?

                                                Karen Ann DeMers © 1996

The Best is Yet to Be!

Cold days are these bringing men to their knees,

a feast for the wolves in the Winter woods.

Pray not to be prey by shattered hearts seized,

bitterness wholeheartedly understood. 

Memorable times of loves far away,

wash over me like the high ocean tides.

I gave my heart so freely come what may,

waiting for the sun and moon to collide. 

For that which takes my soul to rue despair

the glistening hopes are of good favor.

Yet, I shall breathe again in caution’s care,

for the passion of love, I shall savor. 

My heart dawns, it sincerely dawns for thee,

for this fact surely the best is yet to be.

by Timothy Michael DiVito  2020

HOW TO WRITE THE PERFECT SYNOPSIS

 

Royal FP(From a Writer’s Work Shop)

Most agents will ask you to send them a submission pack containing three items:

  • A covering letter (see advice here and sample here)
  • A synopsis
  • The first three chapters / 10,000 words of                                                                         your novel

Most agents will look at the covering letter first, then turn to the manuscript. If they like the first three chapters, they’ll be thinking, “This book looks really interesting. I’m definitely tempted . . . but is the author going to hold my interest over the full 300 / 400 pages? Is it worth me making that investment of time to read the whole thing?”

That’s where the synopsis comes in. The synopsis is there to answer the question, “What is the story of this book? Is there a clear story arc and will there be a satisfying ending?”

Obviously the actual experience of reading a synopsis is quite underwhelming. Synopses are boring, technical documents which (we hope) would not be true of your novel. But that doesn’t matter. Agents know synopses are dull, so all your synopsis really has to do is:

  • tell the agent in very clear terms what your story is
  • make it clear what your hook / premise / elevator pitch is (more info here)
  • give some kind of feeling for why the story matters & how the jeopardy increases
  • sketch out an ending that feels satisfying

But – and this should be reassuring – agents do know that synopses are hard to write and they care less about the synopsis than any other part of your submission package.That means you probably don’t need to worry excessively about your synopsis – just follow the guidelines below and you’ll do just fine.

How to write a perfect synopsis

A perfect synopsis has the following ingredients:

  • Length: 500-800 words
  • Main purpose: Summarise your plot
  • Secondary purpose: Make it clear what Unique Selling Point your book has
  • Language: Be businesslike: clear, to the point, neutral.
  • Presentation: Be well-presented: no typos or spelling mistakes. Normal font size, normal margins. Line spacing no narrower than 1.5
  • Character names. It helps if you put the names of main characters in bold or CAPS when you first introduce them. That way, if an agent has forgotten who Carlotta is, it’s easy for them to skim back and jog their memory. (Remember that agents are reading a lot of these things, so they have about a million character names in their heads at any one time.)
  • Extra points. It’s certainly not essential, but if you have a really compelling way to ‘sell’ your story in 2-3 lines maximum, then you could insert that little snippet up at the top of your synopsis as a way of reminding agents why they’re interested in this MS in the first place. For example, a certain Ms Rowling might have opened her synopsis with, “Harry Potter, an orphan, thinks he is an ordinary boy when an owl brings him a letter inviting him to attend wizard school.” That’s not strictly speaking synopsis material, but it does instantly emphasise the book’s appeal.
  • And remember: Tell the story: your job is not to sell the book, write dust jacket blurb, or anything else. Just say what happens in the story. That’s all you need to do.

And luckily there are things you don’t need to do:

  • Go into great detail about setting. If you were writing a synopsis for a Jane Austen novel for example, you might simply say “This novel is set in a small village in Regency England.”
  • Go into vast detail about character – a few quick strokes are all that you need. For example you might say: “Bridget Jones – a ditzy, mildly boozy twenty-something – …”
  • Be scrupulous about plot detail. It’s fine to skip over subplots or ignore some of the finer detail of how X accomplishes Y. The truth is, you won’t have time to include those things in a 700 word summary anyway. Agents know that the synopsis is at best an approximation of the story so you don’t need to have a troubled consicence.
  • You also don’t have to give away your very final plot twist – though you should make it clear that there is one. For example, you could write, “When Olivia finally catches up with Jack at the abandoned lighthouse, he tells her the real secret of his disappearance – and their final bloody reckoning ensues.” Mostly though, a synopsis is the ultimate plot spoiler, and your job is just to spill the beans whether you like it or not.

Word Painting – The Fine Art of Writing Descriptively

Word Painting

Word Painting – The Fine Art of Writing Descriptively by Rebecca McClanahan (an excerpt from Writer’s Digest, January 2015) Here are four secrets to keep in mind as you breathe life into your characters through description.

  1.   Description that relies solely on physical attributes too often turns into what Janet Burroway calls the “all-points bulletin.”

It reads something like this: “My father is a tall, middle-aged man of average build. He has green eyes and brown hair and usually wears khakis and oxford shirts.”

This description is so mundane, it barely qualifies as an “all-points bulletin.” Can you imagine the police searching for this suspect? No identifying marks, no scars or tattoos, nothing to distinguish him. He appears as a cardboard cutout rather than as a living, breathing character. Yes, the details are accurate, but they don’t call forth vivid images. We can barely make out this character’s form; how can we be expected to remember him?

When we describe a character, factual information alone is not sufficient, no matter how accurate it might be. The details must appeal to our senses. Phrases that merely label (like tall, middle-aged, and average) bring no clear image to our minds. Since most people form their first impression of someone through visual clues, it makes sense to describe our characters using visual images. Green eyes is a beginning, but it doesn’t go far enough. Are they pale green or dark green? Even a simple adjective can strengthen a detail. If the adjective also suggests a metaphor—forest green, pea green, or emerald green—the reader not only begins to make associations (positive or negative) but also visualizes in her mind’s eye the vehicle of the metaphor—forest trees, peas, or glittering gems.

  1. The problem with intensifying an image only by adjectives is that adjectives encourage cliché.

It’s hard to think of adjective descriptors that haven’t been overused: bulging or ropy muscles, clean-cut good looks, frizzy hair. If you use an adjective to describe a physical attribute, make sure that the phrase is not only accurate and sensory but also fresh. In her short story “Flowering Judas,” Katherine Anne Porter describes Braggioni’s singing voice as a “furry, mournful voice” that takes the high notes “in a prolonged painful squeal.” Often the easiest way to avoid an adjective-based cliché is to free the phrase entirely from its adjective modifier. For example, rather than describing her eyes merely as “hazel,” Emily Dickinson remarked that they were “the color of the sherry the guests leave in the glasses.”

  1. Strengthen physical descriptions by making details more specific.

In my earlier “all-points bulletin” example, the description of the father’s hair might be improved with a detail such as “a military buzz-cut, prickly to the touch” or “the aging hippie’s last chance—a long ponytail striated with gray.” Either of these descriptions would paint a stronger picture than the bland phrase brown hair. In the same way, his oxford shirt could become “a white oxford button-down that he’d steam-pleated just minutes before” or “the same style of baby blue oxford he’d worn since prep school, rolled carelessly at the elbows.” These descriptions not only bring forth images, they also suggest the background and the personality of the father.

  1. Select physical details carefully, choosing only those that create the strongest, most revealing impression.

One well-chosen physical trait, item of clothing, or idiosyncratic mannerism can reveal character more effectively than a dozen random images. This applies to characters in nonfiction as well as fiction. When I write about my grandmother, I usually focus on her strong, jutting chin—not only because it was her most dominant feature but also because it suggests her stubbornness and determination. When I write about Uncle Leland, I describe the wandering eye that gave him a perpetually distracted look, as if only his body was present. His spirit, it seemed, had already left on some journey he’d glimpsed peripherally, a place the rest of us were unable to see. As you describe real-life characters, zero in on distinguishing characteristics that reveal personality: gnarled, arthritic hands always busy at some task; a habit of covering her mouth each time a giggle rises up; a lopsided swagger as he makes his way to the horse barn; the scent of coconut suntan oil, cigarettes, and leather each time she sashays past your chair.

What Would The Greatest Generation Do?

Many in the younger generation really need to read this because many have been corrupted by what surrounds them: racism, greed, lust, hate, and no inner core, no belief in goodness, sharing or true love; only anger.

charles french words reading and writing

Poor_mother_and_children,_Oklahoma,_1936_by_Dorothea_Lange

(https://commons.wikimedia.org)

My parents were in the generation that faced the twin horrors of The Great Depression and World War Two. They experienced economic hardships past anything that we are suffering today. They fought a war against two tyrannies in Japan and Germany. They fought in a war, that at the most conservative, estimate killed 56 million people. The Greatest Generation did not worry about being inconvenienced; they did not let fear stop them. They did what they had to do, and they sacrificed in ways that are almost incomprehensible to people today.

american-troops-approaching-omaha-beach-on-normandy-beach-d-day-world-war-ii_800

(https://www.goodfreephotos.com)

I shake my head when I see people protesting the lockdowns that are aimed at saving lives. They speak of inconvenience. Could these people have fought World War Two or lived through the hardships of the Great Depression? I think not. I know people are frustrated, but people gathering in crowds in protests, with no masks, are…

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