The Legacy of Milly, Part 3

A Teacher's Reflections

In Part2, Milly came onto the scene, meeting the children and Gloria.  She accepted the “challenge” – as she called it – of quilting a mural which would become a Peace Quilt.  Gloria started the ball rolling with her own blankie, actually her personal Peace Quilt.

Part 3

As I collected photos for this story, look what I found in my archives:
the original sketch!

When the sketch was finished and children had decided that the quilt would be ‘just so’, they spent time coloring their design.  This solidified their images of Peace and reinforced how they wanted the quilt to look.  It was coming to life.

Milly came to school every week with fabrics.  They were gorgeous!  I asked her if she had purchased them at JoAnne Fabrics.  Her silence was deafening.  I compare this faux pas to asking a lady wearing an original Oscar de la…

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The Legacy of Milly, Part 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part 2 of The Legacy of Milly and the beginning of the design of the quilt with the children and Milly hard at work. This 7 Part true story series was a work of love for Jennie’s students and by Milly, a quilter extraordinary.                                                        As written by Jennie Fitzkee,   https://jenniefitzkee.com/2018/07/06/the-legacy-of-milly-part-2/

A Teacher's Reflections

In Part 1, I discovered a Peace Portal at a museum and recreated it in my classroom.  Peace became a big deal and very real to children.  When I saw quilts that were murals, I knew I had to make a Peace Quilt with children.  The only problem was finding a quilter.  At last I met Milly.  It was an unexpected meeting.

Part 2

“Milly is the best quilter, not just in town but everywhere.” said the director of the Senior Center.

“Great!  When can I stop by and meet her?”

“She’ll be here on Wednesday with her quilting group.”

Wednesday couldn’t come fast enough for me.  As soon as school was over, I was there.  I walked over to Milly and introduced myself.  She smiled (sort of) and I bounced around, telling her all about the Haitian quilts I had seen at the Bennington Museum.  I was so…

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The Legacy of Milly the Quilter- a Series of Stories

This is Milly, the Quilter.

A Teacher's Reflections

Milly the quilter, a beloved friend to children in my classroom (and to me!) for ages, and the creator of many quilts designed by the children and hanging in places of prominence, has recently passed away.  Her last words to me were, “Jennie, I am 88 years old.  I have lived a wonderful life.  What else is there?”

I will be posting a series of stories about Milly over the next few weeks.  Her legacy needs to recognized.  Her story, our story, is remarkable. Each quilt we created together was an adventure.  So, hang onto your hats and enjoy the stories of Milly. Stay tuned for Part 1.

Jennie

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The Legacy of Milly, Part 1

I am reblogging this 7 part story, one for each day, for those bloggers that may have missed this heartwarming, healing, and true story, that lead to a quilt being hung in the Foster House at the Boston VA Hospital for our soldiers, as designed by Jennie’s young students with the help of Milly, a quilter, to make a beautiful quilt.

A Teacher's Reflections

Every good story has a great backstory.  To know how Milly came into my life and tell you about her early years in my classroom, I have to back up and tell you what really happened.  It’s a great story, and began what would become a legacy.  Hang onto your hat!

“It happened like this…”

My husbabnd and I were at a fall wedding in Philadelphia.  We had an hour to spare, and went to the historic district to visit Carpenters Hall. After the tour, we had ten or fifteen minutes until all the museums closed.  Directly across the street was the National Liberty Museum, so we headed over.  Walking into the museum I was thunderstruck by a magnificent Peace Portal.  I stood underneath, soaking in all the beauty.  The museum was closing, and I hadn’t moved from under the Peace Portal.

Image result for national liberty museum peace portal

“I can do this!” I told my husband…

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Fiction Writing Exercises: Narrative Arcs

Fiction Writing Exercises: Narrative Arcs https://www.writingforward.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/fiction-writing-exercises-narrative-arcs.jpg by Melissa Donovan | Jul 19, 2018 | Fiction Writing Exercises | 0 comments

Fiction writing Exercise Narrative Arcs

Narrative arcs: a fiction writing exercise.

Today’s fiction writing exercise is an excerpt from my book, Story Drills: Fiction Writing Exercises. This one focuses on story structure and examines narrative arcs within stories and across multiple scenes and installments of a story. Enjoy!

Narrative Arcs

An arc has a beginning, a middle, and an end. The events within an arc result in some kind of change for the story world, characters, or direction of the plot.

In serial or episodic storytelling, a story arc is an ongoing story line that spans multiple installments. An arc might last through several episodes of a television show or several issues of a comic book. In literature, an arc might stretch across multiple books in a series.

A narrative arc (or dramatic arc) is similar to a story arc, except it doesn’t have to occur across multiple installments of episodic storytelling. A narrative arc is any arc within a story, including the central plot and any subplots. Narrative arcs can occur within a single scene or span across a sequence of scenes.

Characters also experience arcs when they undergo a progression of transformation.

That’s a lot of different types of arcs. To make matters more confusing, the terms for story arcs, narrative arcs, and dramatic arcs are often used interchangeably.

Study:

You can use any type of story for this exercise: books, comics, TV shows, or films. Find a series that you’ve enjoyed, and examine a small sample of installments. For example, you can look at five episodes from a TV show or three novels from a series. Make sure you’re using serials, which use ongoing stories across multiple installments, rather than episodic installments, which are separate but loosely connected.

Make a list of three to five story arcs found across the installments you examined. Do the arcs intertwine? Are they occurring simultaneously, or are they consecutive? How does each arc relate to the central plot?

Practice:

Create a set of three story arcs that would span multiple novels in a series. If you’re already working on a series, feel free to create arcs within your project.

For example, start by writing quick summaries of at least five novels in a series (about one paragraph each, highlighting the central plot of each installment). Then come up with the three arcs, each of which would span multiple novels.

As an alternative, you can develop ideas for a television or comic book series.

Questions:

What is the difference between a story arc and a dramatic arc? Why are story arcs effective in serial storytelling? How is a character arc different from a narrative arc? What types of arcs are most important in storytelling?

Fiction Writing Exercises: Narrative Arcs https://www.writingforward.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/fiction-writing-exercises-narrative-arcs.jpg

 

12 Book Marketing and Book Selling Goosers for Authors – by Judith Briles…

As writers, we can and do write really good books, but if no one sees them, especially if one is a Indie author, it is very sad indeed. We do need good strategies about marketing and thank you Judith!

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

on The Book Shepherd:

We authors need to be strategic in how we market ourselves and our books. Period. 

Bookselling is way beyond the bookstore—in fact, bookstores are minor players for the great majority of authors today–especially the independent, small press and self-published author.

Is there one true way to do market books? Nope, with the exception … do something–not just anything–something that the target marketing is receptive to. And that means YOU, the author need to do some homework.

Continue reading HERE

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In Search of History

What an amazing look into history and is history repeating itself by President Trump’s dereliction of his oath of office to protect democracy?

Kathy Lauren Miller

29edf6e7cf452805e848d7975308c1f9The key lesson of the 20th century is that democracy is far more fragile than we might think.

Prior to WWII, fascist ideas were increasingly accepted. The energetic growth of Nazi organizations spread across America in the 1930’s. This appeal of fascists ideas were held by such prominent citizens as Henry Ford and Charles Lindbergh, who went so far as to praise Hitler.

At the time, Jews served the same role as immigrants and minorities do today.  It was believed that Jews posed threats that were undermining America’s greatness. In 1942 a Gallup poll showed that a growing number of Americans thought Hitler was doing the “right thing” to Jews. This is similar to what many Americans think about what Trump is doing to immigrants and foreign minorities today: “the right thing”.  While secure borders are critical to our national security, we need to keep in mind those who are…

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10 wonderful quotes about being a writer #amwriting #writer #writerslife

These quotes are so uplifting for writers and thank you for sharing them us. #I am writing!

The Writing Chimp


“You fail only if you stop.”

~ Ray Bradbury


“This is what separates artists from ordinary people: the belief, deep in our hearts, that if we build our castles well enough, somehow the ocean won’t wash them away.”

~ Anne Lamott


“Every human being has hundreds of separate people living under his skin. The talent of a writer is his ability to give them their separate names, identities, personalities, and have them relate to other characters living with him.”

~ Mel Brooks


“Most people carry their demons around with them, buried down deep inside. Writers wrestle their demons to the surface, fling them out onto the page, then call them characters.”

~ C.K. Webb


“The more you leave out, the more you highlight what you leave in.”

~Henry Green


“Which of us has not felt that the character we are reading in the printed page is more real than the…

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Creating Atmosphere In Fiction – by Esther Chilton

This is so important to know how to do for a writer. We visualize what we write and what we read and to promote the reality in the novels we are writing, it is a critical part in the writing process. Thank you for sharing.

Hugh's Views & News  

Today, I’m delighted to welcome Esther Chilton to my blog.

While I’m putting the finishing touches to my next short story collection, Esther kindly accepted my invitation to write a guest post. This is a must-read for anyone who is in the process of writing fiction, whether it is for an upcoming book, competition, for publication in a magazine, or as a blog post.  Esther gives lots of great writing advice and tips over on her blog.

#writingtips #writing #authors Image Credit: Pixabay

To be successful, a short story or novel needs to develop a strong sense of atmosphere. This draws your readers into your story so they can imagine this world you are creating. It also sets up expectations for them and gives them information about the characters they’re likely to meet in your story.

Here are some ways to help you ensure your readers feel as if they’re right there alongside your…

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