Beyond Tomorrow

 

 

 

 

 

Face forward into a windy day and listen,

Feel the sun upon your face and dream,

Watch the clouds and learn to change,

Look to a starry night and know light even in darkness,

Gaze upon fields of wheat and see the gold,

Go barefoot on a stony path and dance,

Watch the trees in the forest and learn to see,

Look upon mountains high and know the nobility in a blade of grass,

Hear thunder on a stormy day and feel the power,

Feel rain drops fall upon your face and drink,

Watch lightening cross the sky and learn to strive,

Look onto the heavens and know the magnificence of you,

Feel the sand beneath your feet and run,

Watch seabirds fly and learn to soar,

Listen to the ocean and hear the siren’s song,

Look to the endless blue horizon and know infinity,

See life as one brand new so that you will remember,

That you have come and gone before,

And delight in all you see that you may learn,

To look beyond tomorrow that you may know forever,

By K. Demers Dowdall 

Copyright 2010  

Interview with Writer and Author, Charles F. French, Part 2

 

 

 

 

Good day to you Professor Charles F. French!  Thank you  for taking time, in your busy schedule, between teaching literature at two universities in eastern Pennsylvania and writing great horror novels! I just read your latest horror novel,  Gallows Hill, and it is a blockbuster of a horror novel!  I am very interested in discovering more about why reading, writing, and teaching is the love of your life.  Thank you for answering the following questions.  I know your readers are as anxious to know all about you as I am.

1.  How do you get your ideas for writing books, such as Maledicus, your first published book, but not the only novel you have written?

This may sound odd, and I do not know what it says about either me or the creative process, but I see characters and wonder what their stories are. I begin to think about them, and I jot down my ideas. And I never seem to run out of ideas.

2.  Do you feel that novels should have a moral dilemma that must be addressed?

I do not think that all novels should have a moral dilemma in them—that must be up to the author to decide, but I can say that in my novels, I always have at least one, if not more, moral dilemmas that the characters face in the course of the action.

3.  Do you research your story before you begin to write a novel?

I do not have a set pattern when it comes to research for my novels. I usually do the research as I come across something I do not know for the books. Then I attack the research to learn as much as I can about it. Because I never outline a book, I cannot be sure what it is I will need to learn until I reach that point. I am not suggesting that anyone else should follow my way of research, only that it is what I do. Each writer must find his/her own paths.

4.  In your latest novel, Gallows Hill what single idea inspired you to write this story?

Its origin is found in the first book in this series: Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society, book 1. The three men who create the ghost-investigation group all have lost someone very close to them to death. The first book focused on Roosevelt, and this one focuses on Sam, who lost his teenaged son, Josh to suicide. Sam carries deep grief with him, and the book is about his search to find answers about his son’s death. So, the theme of the past intruding on the present also informs the creation of the supernatural villain of the book, a former executioner/fundamentalist preacher who just cannot seem to let go of his need to punish those he considers to be sinners.

5.  Are you presently writing another novel and can you give us an idea of what it is about and why did you chose this subject matter?

Yes, I have written the first of a Young Adult series that I am currently pitching to agents, and I hope that I can break through into traditional publishing with it. It is an environmental post-apocalyptic novel, informed by the middle ages. I am also working on the first draft of the first book in a fantasy series that I thought would be midgrade but now I realize is adult fantasy. The themes of the evils of the world and how they intrude through fantastic events into the lives of several youngsters is too powerful, vivid, and horrific to be anything but adult fantasy.

6.  I have been told you that have also written another novel that has not yet been published. What is the name of this novel and when will it be published?

The name of the next book in the paranormal investigation series is Evil Lives After: The Investigative Paranormal Society, Book 3, and it will come out around Halloween in 2019.

7. Is there anything else that you would like to add to this discussion?

First, thank you to K. D. Dowdall for conducting this interview with me. Second, I want to say to all writers out there: continue to do what you do, and never lose hope or dedication to your craft and your art.

 

 

An Interview with Charles F. French, Writer and Author, Part 1

 

 

 

 

Good day to you Professor Charles F. French!  Thank you for taking time in your busy schedule, between teaching literature at two universities in eastern Pennsylvania and writing great horror novels! I just read your latest horror novel,  Gallows Hill, and it is a blockbuster of a horror novel!  I am very interested in discovering more about why reading, writing, and teaching is the love of your life.  Thank you for answering the following questions.  I know your readers are as anxious  to know all about you as I am.

  1. How old were you when you started reading books?

I was three years old I believe. I know I cannot remember not being able to read, and I know that my mom always read to me from a very young age.

  1. What kind of books, when you were a child, interested you the most?

I loved reading any kind of adventure, fantasy, or science-fiction the most. By the time I was in elementary school, I remember reading the Tarzan series and several of the Jules Verne novels such as Journey to the Center of the Earth and Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.

  1. What is the name of your favorite book when you were a teenager?

This is a more difficult question to narrow down to one at that time, but if I had to choose one, it was Narcissus and Goldmund by Hermann Hesse, a novel about two friends of different backgrounds and interests and how their lives intertwined. When I was a teenager, exploration of mysticism and spirituality, both issues in this novel, were a part of many people’s lives.

  1. What was it that made you interested in writing books about horror stories?

I have enjoyed horror novels and movies since I was young. I read both Frankenstein and Dracula as a young teenager, and I always enjoyed the Universal Studios horror movies of the 1930s and 1940s. As I grew, I came to understand that horror in novels is often a metaphor for the true horror of the world. I do not see it as a way to escape reality, although reading is very useful to do that and it is fun, but as a prism or lens through which light can be focused on very real problems in life. Does that make sense?  So, I have tried both to tell interesting stories in my writing but also to explore important problems in the world in them.

  1. What made you want to be a professor of literature?

I originally wanted to be an actor. Theater was my first love in terms of profession, but I soon found out that I was not good enough to stand out from the others and unlikely to make a living from it. I also did not want to spend at least 20 years trying to make it as an actor. My whole life story is one of following unusual paths, but without going into great detail, I will say that I had dropped out of college, then after working as a steel-worker for several years, wanted to go back to school. I did return to college while working full-time as a janitor. I earned my degree as an adult student, and I realized then that I had both a talent and a passion for teaching, so my course was set.

  1. Why do you think it is important to spend a great deal of your time mentoring?

I have had the good fortune in my life to have had several professors go out of their ways to help me when I needed it the most. As I have become older, I realized that not only do I have much to pass along as a teacher of literature, but also I can offer whatever knowledge I have to younger people, including adult students, about life, books, and writing. I hope I do not sound full of myself in this answer.

Tuesday, February 27 – Part 2 of my Interview with Charles F. French, Writer and Author!

*****NEW RELEASE LIVE ON AMAZON NOW!****** 

Remember to Register and Vote

Thank you Charles F. French! This is the most important thing to do – VOTE!

charles french words reading and writing

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(https://pixabay.com)

If you are one of the people who was horrified by the recent tragedy of the Parkland, Florida school shooting and you wish to do something to enact changes in gun legislation, there is one crucial action or actions you should take: if you are not registered to vote, register immediately, and then vote.

There is no excuse for not voting–none. And if you want to enact gun control legislation, then do your research and find out where the candidates stand. The population of the United States consistently polls that it wants gun control, so act on your convictions.

Voting is one of the most powerful, if not the most powerful, tools in our democracy, and I hope the young people who are leading this fight also register to vote when they are 18 and then vote. If we, who want gun control legislation, do vote, then our voices…

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Love Note

This is such apart of what teachers do, they grow things, like the love of reading, love of learning and to love others, especially a beloved teacher, like Jennie. Awesome! Beautiful!

A Teacher's Reflections

“Dear Jennie, I can’t wait to see you.  But I don’t see you much.  So I am so happy to see you and I will see you the rest of the day.  Jennie I love you so much.”

I love you too, Scarlett. ❤️

Jennie

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So What is Wrong with America and So Right with Canada?

 

 

 

 

 

 

I asked myself why Canada has no School Shootings, No Concert Shootings, No Church Shootings, and Mall Shootings? Why are they without so much violence in their everyday lives and why does America have 33,000 deaths a year and Canada, all most none. What is the difference?

Canadians have lots of rifles and guns. They do lots of hunting of deer, caribou, quail, sometimes bears, and even wolves.  So why is it we have so much violence everyday in our lives, in every city, town, and community in America. The difference is they have smart, common sense gun laws, they have diversity from every country, they care about their children’s lives, their families and friends. So, what is wrong with America?The Canadians have no weapons of war – no AR 15s, no AK 47s for one thing.

They don’t hate you for the color you are or what religion you are or how much money or power you have. So which country is more democratic: Canada! They also don’t have people dying without healthcare, although the wait line may be longer, kids don’t go hungry, they have good safe schools. So, what is wrong with America?  A lot!

America is a democracy in name only. It has truly become a capitalist society, where the rich get richer, were Citizens United allows huge corporations to own our congress, and the white house. Where people like Trump can ruin everything that our Armed Forces have fought and given their lives for. The reason is we no longer have the following:

“We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.”

We no longer have a Constitution that lives. It died when the lust for money, the pursuit of power and a sickness called greed and the hate of diversity turned our nation into a savage land with the new Motto:

KILL OR BE KILLED, WORSHIP MONEY, and HATE WITH VENGEANCE! 

***I would like to thank Debbie Gies for the photo of Canada life, with good gun laws that prevent mass shootings shown upon,  she had it on her Facebook page and now it is here. Thank you Debbie! She is so wise and smart!

 

 

 

 

A Few Bits Of Good News On The Environment

Thank you Jill, for posting this great news! reblogging! Karen

Filosofa's Word

Yesterday the high temperature where I live was 76° (F), 24° (C).  Yesterday was 20 February 2018.  It is never 76° in my area in February, nor in March.  The average high temperature for this time of year is 43°. Perhaps by mid-April we see temps in the 70s on occasion, but never, ever in February.  Now, admittedly I enjoyed the warmth of the day — Miss Goose and I went for a nice walk … I only managed 3.2 miles, but she went 5.6, and we both felt good about our accomplishments after a winter of inactivity, but … You don’t believe in global warming or in climate change?  Well, I do.

bumblebee on flowerFor one thing, when nearly all of the world’s climate scientists confirm the same data and draw the same conclusion, I am convinced, for they are the experts, not me, not Donald Trump, Rick Perry or Scott…

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