A Review: Far from the Madding Crowd

Far from the Madding Crowd is the first of Hardy’s novels to gain him widespread popularity. What can one say about the incredible writing of Thomas Hardy. This story is lavish and romantic with characters that are unforgettable. The historical details are rich in nuance and fascinating for the period. Hardy’s use of the English language is exquisite. When readers discover Thomas Hardy they always comment, “I fell in love with 19th Century English literature because of Thomas Hardy.” And, so did I.

The Story is set against the backdrop of the beautiful landscape in Wessex, England. The overall theme of the story questions rural values and is striking for its singular sensibility. The story revolves around Bathsheba Everdene and her suitors, as well as the Bathsheba’s difficulties managing a large farm.  One of her suitors, Gabriel Oak is attracted to the very modern sensibility of the independent and spirited Bathsheba. She is also charming, beautiful and vain. However, he must compete with the roguish and dashing soldier, Sergeant Troy, and the wealthy, respectable, middle-aged Farmer Boldwood. While their fates depend upon the choice Bathsheba makes, she must learn the consequences of vain flirtations with all three.

 

5 thoughts on “A Review: Far from the Madding Crowd

    1. Hello D., Yes, I felt the same when I first read it years ago and then I decided to read it again, after I saw the movie on HBO and it is still superb! Thank you for comment – oh yeah, I didn’t know it was a place either until I read it somewhere. K D

      Liked by 1 person

  1. You know I always thought it was the “maddening” crowd. Perhaps because I get anxious in crowds. They are truly maddening. I didn’t realize it was Madding (a place) until I watched the film a couple of years ago. Bathsheba Everdene – what a great name for a protagonist!

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