A Freedom at Risk

This series covers the issues that surfaced in 2015. I had it done at the beginning of 2016, but I have been somewhat slow getting it posted. Southwest Asia, Part 2 Mohanalakshmi Rajakumar is an Indian-American who has lived in Qatar for more than a decade. Initially, she held an administrative staff position with […]

via Global Survey of Academic Freedom Issues in 2015: [Post 20 of a Series] — ACADEME BLOG

Divine transcendent beings

fauxcroft

Divinity of being from carrying out good deeds and acts selflessly even at the cost to yourself is a rare quality found in many but those who it resides in are awakened souls of grace, light and love. This have never been seen in those who seek power, materialism and greed, or in those who aspire to cause harm through violence, war and murder. It is a trait within those who are of the highest transcendace of being. If you meet one listen watch and learn from them. If you are one I am humbled before you. This is what we should all aspire to be.

View original post

Think NEH Funding is Only a Federal Issue? Think Again.

ACADEME BLOG

BY BRIAN C. MITCHELL

News reports last week that President Trump’s first budget may eliminate support for the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has alarmed many of humanities supporters and scholars. But the de-funding of the NEH – or the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) — should alarm every American who has used a library, visited a museum, attended a college or university, watched public television, or listened to a public radio station.

Much of the blueprint for elimination seems to be coming from the conservative Heritage Foundation. These cuts are largely symbolic budget-cutting efforts since last year’s combined funding for the NEH, NEA, and CPB totaled 0.02 percent of the federal budget.

The Washington Post put the amount in context noting, “Put another way, if you make $50,000 a year, spending the equivalent of what the government spends on these three…

View original post 811 more words

AMERICAN

Artemisdelmar writes from the heart. When I read this post I felt what she felt when having to check a stupid box. It’s humiliating, divisive, cruel, stupid, and without merit. It belittles the very word “America”.

Palabras DelMar

Why does it matter what box I choose? Do you realize that box makes me feel less American? Like I am an “other” that doesn’t really count as American. I was born and raised in America. My heritage began in Puerto Rico but my roots are grounded in America.  It does not matter what box I check! We are all Americans.

With our different backgrounds we are not statistics, we are people. We are not African-Americans, Indian,  American Indian, Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, White (non-Hispanic), Black (non-Hispanic), Multiracial, etc. we are all AMERICANS. We are Americans divided by labels, we are Americans that are categorized and grouped according to our race, but we are all AMERICANS.

My daughter came home one day and said “Mommy we have to do a project on our culture, I chose a Thanksgiving feast because we are American.” This made me think about how we classify and…

View original post 417 more words

Courage Under Fire

Reblogged, Originally posted on charles french words reading and writing: https://pixabay.com “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” “Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.” “Courage is an inner resolution to go forward despite obstacles; Cowardice is submissive surrender to circumstances. Courage breeds creativity; Cowardice represses fear and…

via The Wisdom of Martin Luther King Jr. — charles french words reading and writing

Fighting Darkness with Light

Guest blogger J. Michael Rifenburg teaches at the University of North Georgia. This is a letter he send to the Dahlonega Nugget, the local newspaper in his community. It appeared there recently: I’ve only been a college professor for a decade, but as 2017 begins, I feel my colleagues and I are under attack from outside stakeholders more […]

via Fighting Darkness with Light — ACADEME BLOG

Literary Style in Storytelling

literary-style-storytelling

 

 

Literary Style in Storytelling Posted by Melissa Donovan on December 13, 2016

· https://www.writingforward.com/storytelling/literary-style-in-storytelling

What’s your literary style?Today’s post includes excerpts from What’s the Story? Building Blocks for Fiction Writing, chapter five:

“Narrative Style, Voice, and Tone.” Enjoy! Literary style is the aesthetic quality of a work of literature—the distinct voice that makes each author unique. It’s the way we string words together, the rhythm of our prose, the catchphrases that pepper our language.

Literary style includes every element of writing in which an author can make stylistic choices from syntax and grammar to character and plot development.

Seasoned writers have cultivated a style of writing that can be identified by a snippet of prose alone. For example, a common English literature test gives you excerpts from several authors whose works you’ve studied. The challenge is to identify the author who wrote each excerpt—not because you’ve memorized each author’s repertoire but to show that you can identify each author by his or her voice.

Style can be contained in a single work, such as a novel, or it can be observed across an author’s entire body of work. One author’s style might be spartan—minimalist in nature—while another author’s style is rich with vibrant language. An author can also exhibit a range of styles, adjusting the aesthetics for each project, depending on what works best for each piece.

Understanding Literary Style

Style is comprised of many components. However, it is not any one component; nor is it all of these components together. Each author (or work) uses a unique combination of components to render a style. Among these components are personality, tone, diction, syntax, grammar, and content.

Authors also make stylistic choices with grammar and punctuation. Cormac McCarthy is one such author who is known for his omission of punctuation marks. Most notably, he didn’t use quotation marks for dialogue in his novel The Road. Nor did he use italics or any other punctuation marks or formatting to mark the dialogue. Dialogue was indicated within the context of the work.

Some authors are known for a style that resonates from the content or the substance of their works. These authors may always write about a particular type of character or topic. For example, one author might write stories that tackle social issues while another writes stories set in hospitals.

Style can also be expressed through structure. Some authors tell stories out of chronological order. Others may consistently use framing devices. Or maybe they’re known for including flashbacks throughout their stories.

It’s not unusual for young and new writers to ignore style. A fledgling storyteller often focuses on more concrete aspects of story, such as plot, character, and setting, along with other key elements like action, dialogue, and description. However, style is an important consideration, especially in literary fiction. In fact, style is one of the defining features of literary fiction, which is renowned for paying homage to the artistry of wordcraft. Some may even argue that the styling of prose and an author’s voice are more important than the crafting of story in literary fiction.

Mastering Literary Style

Style, voice, and tone work together to give an author’s work its unique flavor. Readers often form preferences for stories with a particular stylistic quality and tonality. Some readers don’t like dark stories and will only read stories with a light and casual vibe. Some may prefer fast-paced stories that are focused on action and dialogue, while others like to explore the details of a story world with vivid description and exposition. There are readers who like texts packed with long, fancy words and readers who prefer to skim the text rather than check the dictionary every few paragraphs (or pages).

Many readers may not even be aware of their own stylistic preferences. They’ll scan the first few paragraphs and find something they like about the narrative voice (or something they don’t like), which informs their decision to buy and read the book, which is why literary style is an important element of storytelling.

Want to learn more about literary style? Pick up a copy of What’s the Story? Building Blocks for Fiction Writing.

Putting a Muzzle on All Government Employees! Another Step Closer to Authoritarian Government!

All of the agencies affected by the actions have some input on issues related to the environment and have been involved in various efforts related to climate change.

via U.S. national park climate-related tweets deleted; Donald Trump seeks to muzzle agency employees —

The GasLighting of America!

gettyimages-631482662 “If Donald Trump can undercut America’s trust in all media, he then starts to own them and can start to literally implant his own version of reality.” http://www.nbcnews.com/health/mental-health/some-experts-say-trump-team-s-falsehoods-are-classic-gaslighting-n711021

“The behavior has all the signs of “gaslighting”, says clinical psychologist Bryant Welch, who wrote a 2008 book entitled “State of Confusion: Political Manipulation and the Assault on the American Mind”. Gaslighting refers to a 1944 film in which a murdering husband manipulates and confuses his wife by dimming the gas lights in their home and then denying it’s happening.

“The very state of confusion they are creating is a political weapon in and of itself,” Welch told NBC News. “If you make people confused, they are vulnerable. By definition, they don’t know what to do,” added Welch, who has not personally examined any of the Trump team.

“This is a pretty systematic, sophisticated attempt to gaslight.” “There certainly is a general stereotype that politicians lie,” said Robert Feldman, a University of Massachusetts psychologist and deputy chancellor who specializes in the psychology of lying. But Feldman and Welch both said the statements Trump and his staff made on the very first days in office rise to a new level.  “It is lies about things that are so easily contradicted that it is amazing in terms of the degree of arrogance and the lack of respect that it shows for the American people,” Feldman said.

 

***Bending and manipulating, skewing the truth, causing mental confusion, is classic Chaos techniques, until we walk of the edge of the cliff and we’ve been had, taken for the fools that we are by confusion as to what is real and not real. Telling us how horrible the journalists are as rotten dirty deceitful scoundrels deflects what is really going on – the slow painful destruction of our Democratic Republic until it becomes right under our noses a authoritarian dictatorship. These leaders know what they are doing, they have the “Play Book” right in front of them. What these sly, crafty “manipulators” wish to create is Chaos until, like Russia it is too late, goodbye to freedom of the press, to writers, teachers, even religious leaders. These highly skilled manipulators create falsehoods as truth. So, Grab the Seat of your Pants…we are in for a bumpy ride and I hope we come out of it still being a Democratic Republic – I have my doubts.  K. D. Dowdall