THE CONTENDER

seconds_before_disaster_by_rue_different

 

 

 

 

 

Usually, we don’t think bad things can happen in a relatively stable country but when they do, they happen to “other kinds” of people, especially to those that seem different, whether it is religion, place of origin, lifestyle, or genetics. When certain entities or, for instance; a contender, to be a leader of millions of people, is elected to the highest office and the terrible “suddenly” happens to all of us, we act surprised and say, well “if only we had known.  But, we do know. We always know, we just pretend that somehow “good” will be the result of “ill”.  For instance, dictators often use fear mongering of “others” and this is a consistent trait/trick used by the ill-intended.    As someone once said, “when someone shows you who they are – believe them!  It often takes only one “ill-intended” human to destroy millions of our friends, families, and neighbors because they may be considered to be the “different kind of people”.  And, we do know!

THE MAN OF INIQUITY

Warrior Angel

 

 

 

 

The followers of the madness of a man have lost their way by hate and fear. They do not know the iniquity they follow.  He plays the game with ill intent to ruinous ways he leads all, when the good and the brave fail to act. So, fear not brave souls. A man wants us to be afraid, so do not be afraid. Stand up and say the truth loud and clear! The darkness always vanishes in the light of day.

Delphi Altair – A Review

Delphi Altair Third Edition 11-2015 sample - Copy

A Great Adventure with a Charming Heroine!

By Kirstin Lenane

Simply put: this ageless novel is beautifully done and should be picked up by any fan of epic fantasy stories. I am very impressed by K. D. Dowdall’s ability to weave together so many characters and story-lines into a cohesive whole (it reminded me of the way Dickens and Tolkien are so deftly able to do this). The story takes place mostly in three settings: in a briny, seaside town sometime in the past, in a beautifully evocative land called Janji, and then in a familiar-seeming town sometime in the present day (where McDonald’s and Diet coke and movies exist). Whether K. D. Dowdall is evoking an other-worldly one (filled with magical creatures, such as Snagettes and Tittlecrests) or an earthly one (with clam chowder boiling on the stove and nasty schoolteachers pounding paddles on their desks), her scenes are drawn with such detail that they will pull you in, time and time again.  I really can’t recommend this book enough. Try it! You’ll be hooked and waiting for the next one.

****Kirsten Lenane is a professor of English Literature and Creative Writing. She is also the author of several wonderful children’s books: http://kirstinlenane.com

 

 

 

FANFICTION: ALL ABOUT DIALOGUE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Not being very familiar with Fan Fiction I decided to take a look at what makes fan fiction popular and well, writing is writing so I had to read about it. One website in particular caught my attention because it seemed to be a good place to start. I am always willing to read about dialogue and everything else about improving my writing.)    https://www.howtowritefanfiction.com

The following is an excerpt from the above linked site:

Dialogue is one of your primary story telling tools; it is how you move the story forward and how you reveal things about your character. If you write your story dialogue the way you talk every day, your reader will be bored in no time flat.

Have you ever had a heated discussion with someone, and then hours later, upon reflection, thought of the perfect witty retort?  The best way to describe written dialogue is what you wish you’d said in the heat of the moment. It’s clever, witty, and sometimes misleading.

Dialogue Defined

Speaker Attributions tell the reader who is speaking. He said and she said are the most common variety.

A Beat is a description of physical action that can be used to indicate the speaker instead of an attribution.

How to Write Dialogue

Don’t explain your dialogue.  When you follow dialogue with phrases like “he said angrily” or “she said harshly” you are explaining how the character feels. Instead, their feeling should be obvious by the words they say as well as their actions.  Use of an adverb (ly) almost always catches you in the act of explaining dialogue. Instead of an adverb, use a beat of action to convey your characters feelings.

When you are writing speaker attributions, said is always the right choice.  Do not saddle your characters with impossible actions; you cannot beam, smirk or grin a line of dialogue.  Said is akin to punctuation. It disappears on the page. For the sake of variety, you can use beats of action in place of said.

Always place the character’s name or pronoun first in a speaker attribution. Use ‘Sam said’ instead of ‘said Sam’. This is the professional standard for dialogue.

Choose one way to refer to a character in a scene and stick with it.  Don’t use “Detective” the first time and “Jane” a few paragraphs later.  This is one case where shaking it up for the sake of variety can be confusing.  Please note that this is within the confines of single scene, not the entire story.

Avoid ping ponging dialogue by having your characters refer to each other by name in order to eliminate speaker attributions.  This is just plain awkward. Use the speaker attribution or a beat of action.

Use sentence fragments and contractions to make your dialogue sound real.  Dialogue is the one place you can play fast and loose with grammar.

Do not use dialogue to data dump. Having your characters speak like an entry in Wikipedia is not natural. If you have a chunk of background information to reveal, do it piece by piece through both dialogue and exposition.

Let your characters lie to each other, argue and misunderstand each other. Allow your characters to be suspicious of each other, to wonder what the truth is. Real life is never wrapped up in a neat package, so give your characters the chance to disagree and they’ll sound more human.

Do This:

Read your dialogue out loud. Listen to see if it sounds natural, and if you can differentiate the characters in your scene by the words they say. As you listen, you should be able to find places where you stumble over words or places where you need beats of action. If your dialogue sounds stiff, make sure it isn’t announcing information that could be imparted through exposition.

My take on this short informative writing about dialogue:

Well, yes, a couple of good reminder points for the absolute beginning writer (oh wait – that’s me) with three books written and another being written as I write, I still consider myself a total beginner. I have actually found a few of the writing lessons here very  interesting. For instance, the Seven Point Story Structure, All About Dialogue, and Revision are all helpful when writing.

I found I was actually committing a few sins in my dialogue that I was not even aware I was doing.  I found this site very to the point with few flourishes of dialogue because, frankly, I need to write.

SHE

 

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She,

A being unfolding in the light of knowledge,

A child of life forever opening windows,

To the world,

And lighting candles in dark passages,

She,

Searches in clouds of gray for the color of truth,

And the touch of truth upon her soul,

She,

A glistening aura, a tremble with wonder,

At all there is to learn,

To be,

To embrace in the universe.

 

Ecstatic Moments!

beloved-autumnskyemorrison

Life has two ecstatic moments,

One when the spirit catches,

The sight of truth,

The other is when it recognizes,

A kindred spirit…

Perhaps it is only in the land of truth

That spirits may,

Discern each other; as it is when they

Are helping each other on,

That they may best hope to arrive.

Guesses at Truth